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FALSE: Elizabeth Warren has never passed a bill

Elizabeth’s gotten over a dozen of her proposals passed through Congress and signed into law since the beginning of 2017.

Plain and simple, she knows how to get things done – fighting side-by-side with a grassroots army of supporters and finding common ground on Capitol Hill – to help level the playing field for working people.

Making Hearing Aids More Affordable

Around 40 million Americans have hearing loss, but fewer than 1 in 6 get the help they need. That’s because Medicare and most private insurance plans don’t cover the cost of hearing aids, which run up to an average of $2,400 each. Think about that: $2,400 – and many people need two. How’s that going to fit in a working family’s budget?

Elizabeth talked to a bunch of experts, and they figured out that we could make it a whole lot easier to afford hearing aids by letting people buy simple ones over the counter – like eyeglasses.

So, she got to work. She found members of both parties in Congress who agreed with her. They put their heads down and got the Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act passed by Congress and signed into law by Donald Trump in 2017 as part of the Food And Drug Administration Reauthorization Act.

Helping Civilian Survivors Recover From Terrorist Attacks

American hospitals (thankfully) don’t have a lot of experience treating blast injuries like those seen in an overseas war zone. But when terrorists launch attacks like the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, we need to do everything we can to give survivors the best possible treatment.

Elizabeth met Jessica Kensky and her husband Patrick Downes after they’d both lost their left legs at the finish line. They petitioned the Pentagon for permission to receive treatment at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where the world’s best military doctors have special expertise in treating blast injuries with state-of-the-art care.

On a visit to Walter Reed, Patrick and Jess told Elizabeth about an idea they had to allow survivors of terrorism to access treatment at appropriate military health care facilities. They were very clear: They did not want to take away a single hospital bed from a wounded servicemember who needed care. But when there was room, they hoped to remove some of the bureaucratic red tape with the Department of Defense – and help other survivors of terrorism to recover more fully, like they did.

The Walter Reed doctors and therapists liked the idea too, so Elizabeth got to work. In June 2017, she introduced the bipartisan Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes Act.

Few bills actually make it to the floor of the Senate for a vote. But one bill that always gets a vote is the National Defense Authorization Act. So as a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Elizabeth urged her colleagues – including Chairman John McCain – to include a provision requiring the Department of Defense to prioritize civilian victims of terror, making it easier for individuals who suffer traumatic injuries and require specialized treatment to receive care at military medical facilities. This provision reflects the intent of the Kensky-Downes Act  and Elizabeth’s colleagues agreed to include it in the NDAA.

In June 2017, the NDAA passed through the Armed Services Committee. In September, it passed through the Senate. In November, the final bill passed through Congress. And on December 12, Donald Trump signed it into law, including the provision that will help other survivors of terror like Jessica and Patrick to get the specialized care they need.

Looking After Our Veterans and Servicemembers

When she traveled overseas to visit National Guard soldiers and airmen from Massachusetts and around the country deployed to Kuwait and Iraq, Elizabeth heard from National Guard officers who’d been given promotions – and were already carrying out their new duties – but had to wait months and months for their higher salaries and increased benefits to kick in. The reason? Bureaucratic delays. So, she introduced the National Guard Promotion Accountability Act to speed up the promotion process for National Guard officers and ensure they get the pay and benefits they’ve earned. She successfully got key provisions added to the National Defense Authorization Act, which was passed into law and gave the Pentagon the authority to back-date those delayed officer promotions.

To help more veterans and their family members get access to affordable higher education, Elizabeth co-sponsored the Veterans Education Assistance Act, which became the Veterans Educational Assistance Act, known as the “Forever GI Bill” (bills go through a lot of names in Congress). The law expands benefits for Purple Heart recipients. She also fought for – and helped pass – a provision to protect benefits for student veterans whose schools (like Corinthian Colleges) shut down, so they don’t miss out on their chance at continuing their education somewhere else.

Her Veterans Care Financial Protection Act fought back against predatory scam artists who’d targeted veterans trying to get help from a VA assisted care program.

And, with a Republican co-sponsor, she introduced the Women Veterans Peer Counseling Enhancement Act to ensure that the VA’s Peer Support Program has enough peer counselors to address the mental health needs of women veterans.  Key provisions of this legislation were then passed into law as part of the bipartisan SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act.

She’s also worked across the aisle to help servicemembers by improving veterans’ screening and treatment for gambling disorders, increasing support for survivors of sexual assault in the military, cracking down on online sexual harassment by making it an offense in the Uniform Code of Military Justice to share someone’s private images without their consent, and studying new ways to prevent traumatic brain injury from exposure to blasts in combat zones.

Fighting the Opioid Crisis

One in four Massachusetts residents knows someone who has died from an opioid overdose. Think about that: One in four. The opioid crisis is a daily emergency. Elizabeth knows that we have to do everything we can to fight back, and she’s helped steer the government to make a real difference.

In October 2018, Congress passed a bipartisan SUPPORT For Patients And Communities Act, which included several provisions Elizabeth had introduced to give physicians, first responders, and communities more tools to fight the opioid epidemic:

  • Improving hospices’ ability to dispose of unused opioids
  • Strengthening best practices for recovery housing
  • Helping more providers and patients partially fill opioid prescriptions – to cut down on the unused supply
  • Enhancing security for and data on opioid prescriptions through electronic prescriptions
  • Giving more resources for public health officials to detect fentanyl and help prevent more overdoses
  • Expanding peer counseling for female veterans

Every step we take against the opioid epidemic helps saves lives, and we have to go further. Elizabeth is ready to keep building on what Congress has already accomplished. She’ll keeping fighting for more federal investment that would make a game-changing difference against opioid addiction.

Donald Trump has signed more than a dozen of Elizabeth’s proposals into law

  1. Over-The-Counter Hearing Aid Act: Introduced By Elizabeth, Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The FDA Reauthorization Act
  2. Veterans Education Assistance Act: Originally Co-Sponsored By Elizabeth, Passed Congress Unanimously And Signed Into Law As Part Of The Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act
  3. Veterans Education Relief And Reinstatement Act: Originally Co-Sponsored By Elizabeth, Passed Congress Unanimously And Signed Into Law As Part Of The Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act
  4. Jessica Kensky And Patrick Downes Act: Introduced By Elizabeth, Key Intent Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The Fiscal Year 2018 National Defense Authorization Act
  5. Protecting Servicemembers Online Act: Introduced By Elizabeth, Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The Fiscal Year 2018 National Defense Authorization Act
  6. Provision To Study The Impact Of Exposure To Blast Pressure From Heavy Weapons: Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The Fiscal Year 2018 National Defense Authorization Act
  7. Gambling Addiction Prevention Act: Introduced By Elizabeth, Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The Fiscal Year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act
  8. Sexual Trauma Response And Treatment (START) Act: Introduced by Elizabeth, Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act For Fiscal Year 2019
  9. National Guard Promotion Accountability Act: Introduced by Elizabeth, Key Intent Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act For Fiscal Year 2019
  10. Veterans Care Financial Protection Act: Introduced By Elizabeth, House Version Passed Congress And Signed Into Law
  11. Hospice Safe Drug Disposal Act: Introduced By Elizabeth, Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The SUPPORT For Patients And Communities Act
  12. Ensuring Access To Quality Sober Living Act: Introduced By Elizabeth, Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The SUPPORT For Patients And Communities Act
  13. Unused Medication Awareness Act: Introduced By Elizabeth, Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The SUPPORT For Patients And Communities Act
  14. Every Prescription Conveyed Securely Act: Originally Co-Sponsored By Elizabeth, Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The SUPPORT For Patients And Communities Act
  15. STOP Fentanyl Deaths Act Of 2018: Introduced By Elizabeth, Passed Congress And Signed Into Law As Part Of The SUPPORT For Patients And Communities Act

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